Southville Student Hosts the First Speedcubing Competition in Las Piñas

Southville International School and Colleges hosted the first ever Speedcubing competition in Las Piñas at the Multiple Purpose Hall last April 3, 2016.

The event called Las Piñas Open 2016 @ SISC was attended by 80 contestants and held several events such as the Rubiks Cube, 4×4 Cube, 5×5 Cube, 6×6 Cube, 7×7 Cube, 3×3 Cube Blindfolded, Pyraminx, and Skewb recognized by the World Cube Association and Philippine Cubers Association, the world and national governing body of Speedcubing.

The winners had broken the Philippine record on Speedcubing with Joselle Kim Sublay at rank 1 in Rubrik’s Cube and 4×4 Cube with an average of 10.38 s and 38.47 s respectively; Simon Lim in 5×5 Cube and 3×3 Blindfolded with 1:17.42 and 42.68 s respectively; Niño Francis Reyes in 6×6 and 7×7 Cube, with 2:17.59 and 3:35.30 respectively; Michael Angelo Zafra in Pyraminx with 4.05 s; and Richard Espinosa in Skewb with 5.81 s.

Honorable mentions include Erwin Reyes with the best of 9.18 s in Rubik’s Cube, and Moses San Pascual with the best of 4.96s in Skewb, which put them into Philippines rank 2 of Speedcubing.

The event organizer, Yuji Yoshida, a Southville Accountancy student, said that the event was overwhelming and made him feel very accomplished, citing that some veteran speedcubers congratulated him on organizing the “best event they’ve ever attended in their whole career as speedcubers”.

Yuji hoped the event could attract more people to Speedcubing as it enhances concentration, memory and logical thinking.

“It will expand your horizon. I have reached Urdaneta, Pangasinan, a seven-hour bus ride, to attend a competition. I have met so many people, and visited so many places I thought I never could. I never thought a Rubrik’s cube would bring me this far.

“Speedcubing is a great hubby. Once it gets to you, you will never forget. The Community is friendly – from beginners to National Record holders, everyone is kind and passionate. Hardware is not expensive and is very diverse, with cubes varying from 3×3 up to 13×13 to Pyraminx and Skewb. If the regular method bores you, there are tons of ways to solve a cube. There is always room for improvement, and the sense of accomplishment is what will keep you going,” said Yuji.

Yuji is currently on his fifth year in BS Accountancy and is a member of Southville’s Top Outstanding Performing Students circle.